Esmerelda from The Hunchback of Notre Dame, blind and with Dajali as a guide goat.  
We’ve done blindness before, but check out the guide goat!
Okay, so guide goats aren’t a thing (that we know of, but it would be neat to be proven wrong on that).  In the United States, under Federal law, only dogs and miniature horses could be used for such a purpose in places of public accommodation (airlines, housing, and certain states have different laws in place that allow for more species to work as service animals).  This has information about that sort of thing.  
Guide dogs can be very helpful to many people living with blindness or other severe vision problems.  While there are other ways of mitigating blindness, such as with a cane to tap on the ground, guide dogs are considered by many to be much more effective and allow more personal freedom.  
From the Guide Dogs for the Blind etiquette brochure:

When You Meet a Person Who is Blind
·      Treat a person who is blind the same as you would anyone else. They do the same things as you do, but may use different techniques.
·      Speak in a normal tone of voice. Blindness doesn’t equal hearing loss.
·      Talk directly to a person who is blind, not to their companion. Loss of sight is not loss of intellect.
·      When entering a room, identify yourself; when exiting, be sure to mention that you are leaving. Address the person by name so they will know you are speaking to them.
·      If you leave a person who is blind alone in an unfamiliar area, make sure it is near something they can touch—a wall, table, rail, etc. Being left out in empty space can be very uncomfortable.
·      Be sure to give useful directions. Phrases such as “across the street” and “left at the next corner” are more helpful than vague descriptions like “over there.”
·      Don’t worry about using common, everyday words and phrases like “look,” “see,” or “watching TV” around a person who is blind.
·      If a person looks as though they may need assistance, ask. 
·      They will tell you if they do. If a person who is blind is about to encounter a dangerous situation, voice your concerns in a calm and clear manner.
·      Pulling or steering a person who is blind is awkward and confusing — it’s really not helpful. Avoid grabbing their arm, and please don’t touch or steer a guide dog’s harness.
·      Ask, “Would you like me to guide you?” Offering your elbow is an effective and dignified way to lead someone who is blind. Do not be afraid to identify yourself as an inexperienced sighted guide and ask for tips on how to improve.
·      Be considerate. If you notice a spot or stain on a person’s clothing, tell them privately (just as you would like to be told).
·      In a restaurant, give clear directions to available seats. Your offer to read the menu aloud may be appreciated, but you shouldn’t assume the person would not want to order their own food.
·      When the food arrives, ask if the person would like to know what is on their plate. You can describe the location of food items by using clock positions: “Your coffee is at 3 o’clock”; “The sugar is at 1 o’clock.”
·      Leave doors all the way open or all the way closed — half-open doors or cupboards are dangerous. Don’t rearrange furniture or personal belongings without letting the person know.
·      Be sensitive when questioning someone about their blindness. This is personal information and boundaries should be respected. 
When You Meet a Working Guide Dog Team
·      As tempting as it may be to pet a guide dog, remember that this dog is responsible for leading someone who cannot see. The dog should never be distracted from that duty. A person’s safety may depend on their dog’s alertness and concentration. 
·      It is okay to ask someone if you may pet their guide. Many people enjoy introducing their dogs when they have the time. The dog’s primary responsibility is to its blind partner and it is important that the dog not become solicitous.
·      A guide dog should never be offered food or other distracting treats. Food rewards are used as a motivational and training tool by GDB both in our dog training and by our alumni with their working guide dogs, but those rewards are only given to the dogs by their handlers.
·      Although guide dogs cannot read traffic signals, they are responsible for helping their handlers safely cross a street. Calling out to a guide dog or intentionally obstructing its path can be dangerous for the team as it could break the dog’s concentration on its work. 
·      Listening for traffic flow has become harder for guide dog handlers due to quieter car engines and the increasing number of cars on the road. Please don’t honk your horn or call out from your car to signal when it is safe to cross, which can be distracting and confusing. Be especially careful of pedestrians in crosswalks when turning right on red.
·      It’s not all work and no play for a guide dog. When they are not in harness, they are treated in much the same way as pets. However, for their safety they are only allowed to play with specific toys. Please don’t offer them toys without first asking their handler’s permission.  
·      In some situations, working with a guide dog may not be appropriate. Instead, the handler may prefer to take your arm just above the elbow and allow their dog to heel. Others will prefer to have their dog follow you. In this case, be sure to talk to the handler and not the dog when giving directions for turns.
·      You may encounter a guide dog wearing a head collar, which is a humane training tool that helps a dog become calm and focused when distracted. The head collar is not a muzzle and is designed to permit the dog to fully open its mouth and can even be worn when the dog is eating, drinking, or playing.  
·      Access laws in the U.S. and Canada, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, permit guide dogs to accompany their handlers anywhere the general public is allowed, including taxis and buses, restaurants, theaters, stores, schools, hotels, apartment and office buildings. Guide dogs are trained to stand, sit, or lie quietly in public places when not leading.

All of that is very sound advice!  

Colored pencil.  
~Morning Star

Esmerelda from The Hunchback of Notre Dame, blind and with Dajali as a guide goat.  

We’ve done blindness before, but check out the guide goat!

Okay, so guide goats aren’t a thing (that we know of, but it would be neat to be proven wrong on that).  In the United States, under Federal law, only dogs and miniature horses could be used for such a purpose in places of public accommodation (airlines, housing, and certain states have different laws in place that allow for more species to work as service animals).  This has information about that sort of thing.  

Guide dogs can be very helpful to many people living with blindness or other severe vision problems.  While there are other ways of mitigating blindness, such as with a cane to tap on the ground, guide dogs are considered by many to be much more effective and allow more personal freedom.  

From the Guide Dogs for the Blind etiquette brochure:

When You Meet a Person Who is Blind

·      Treat a person who is blind the same as you would anyone else. They do the same things as you do, but may use different techniques.

·      Speak in a normal tone of voice. Blindness doesn’t equal hearing loss.

·      Talk directly to a person who is blind, not to their companion. Loss of sight is not loss of intellect.

·      When entering a room, identify yourself; when exiting, be sure to mention that you are leaving. Address the person by name so they will know you are speaking to them.

·      If you leave a person who is blind alone in an unfamiliar area, make sure it is near something they can touch—a wall, table, rail, etc. Being left out in empty space can be very uncomfortable.

·      Be sure to give useful directions. Phrases such as “across the street” and “left at the next corner” are more helpful than vague descriptions like “over there.”

·      Don’t worry about using common, everyday words and phrases like “look,” “see,” or “watching TV” around a person who is blind.

·      If a person looks as though they may need assistance, ask.

·      They will tell you if they do. If a person who is blind is about to encounter a dangerous situation, voice your concerns in a calm and clear manner.

·      Pulling or steering a person who is blind is awkward and confusing — it’s really not helpful. Avoid grabbing their arm, and please don’t touch or steer a guide dog’s harness.

·      Ask, “Would you like me to guide you?” Offering your elbow is an effective and dignified way to lead someone who is blind. Do not be afraid to identify yourself as an inexperienced sighted guide and ask for tips on how to improve.

·      Be considerate. If you notice a spot or stain on a person’s clothing, tell them privately (just as you would like to be told).

·      In a restaurant, give clear directions to available seats. Your offer to read the menu aloud may be appreciated, but you shouldn’t assume the person would not want to order their own food.

·      When the food arrives, ask if the person would like to know what is on their plate. You can describe the location of food items by using clock positions: “Your coffee is at 3 o’clock”; “The sugar is at 1 o’clock.”

·      Leave doors all the way open or all the way closed — half-open doors or cupboards are dangerous. Don’t rearrange furniture or personal belongings without letting the person know.

·      Be sensitive when questioning someone about their blindness. This is personal information and boundaries should be respected. 

When You Meet a Working Guide Dog Team

·      As tempting as it may be to pet a guide dog, remember that this dog is responsible for leading someone who cannot see. The dog should never be distracted from that duty. A person’s safety may depend on their dog’s alertness and concentration.

·      It is okay to ask someone if you may pet their guide. Many people enjoy introducing their dogs when they have the time. The dog’s primary responsibility is to its blind partner and it is important that the dog not become solicitous.

·      A guide dog should never be offered food or other distracting treats. Food rewards are used as a motivational and training tool by GDB both in our dog training and by our alumni with their working guide dogs, but those rewards are only given to the dogs by their handlers.

·      Although guide dogs cannot read traffic signals, they are responsible for helping their handlers safely cross a street. Calling out to a guide dog or intentionally obstructing its path can be dangerous for the team as it could break the dog’s concentration on its work.

·      Listening for traffic flow has become harder for guide dog handlers due to quieter car engines and the increasing number of cars on the road. Please don’t honk your horn or call out from your car to signal when it is safe to cross, which can be distracting and confusing. Be especially careful of pedestrians in crosswalks when turning right on red.

·      It’s not all work and no play for a guide dog. When they are not in harness, they are treated in much the same way as pets. However, for their safety they are only allowed to play with specific toys. Please don’t offer them toys without first asking their handler’s permission. 

·      In some situations, working with a guide dog may not be appropriate. Instead, the handler may prefer to take your arm just above the elbow and allow their dog to heel. Others will prefer to have their dog follow you. In this case, be sure to talk to the handler and not the dog when giving directions for turns.

·      You may encounter a guide dog wearing a head collar, which is a humane training tool that helps a dog become calm and focused when distracted. The head collar is not a muzzle and is designed to permit the dog to fully open its mouth and can even be worn when the dog is eating, drinking, or playing. 

·      Access laws in the U.S. and Canada, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, permit guide dogs to accompany their handlers anywhere the general public is allowed, including taxis and buses, restaurants, theaters, stores, schools, hotels, apartment and office buildings. Guide dogs are trained to stand, sit, or lie quietly in public places when not leading.

All of that is very sound advice!  

Colored pencil.  

~Morning Star

There is a bit of this related to mental health.  My sign, Gemini, reads:

"Everyone loves a Gemini because everyone loves a schizophrenic. You like to think that you are a half-and half mixture of Socrates and Michelangelo, but in reality it’s more like Prince and Bea Arthur. You are progressive, outgoing, and one of the most popular rides at Cedar Point. However, you can and will negate all of this by the time you’re finished reading this sentence. Geminis drive funny cars. They often drive them into trees or buildings. Geminis are pushy and overbearing. They pick fights with small children and moon people at weddings. They like to use Libras as punching bags. A bisexual Gemini is a walking double date. The rest are hermaphrodites. Geminis vandalize their own houses. Geminis use far-fetched analogies to describe philosophical concepts. Geminis rarely compete in the Olympics. When they do, it is usually pool or air hockey. Frogger turns up as well. Geminis are always on some sort of medication. This medication is not always legal. Gemini is Latin for “I’m okay, I’m okay.” Geminis speak very loudly in order to be heard. This is unfortunate as they are nearly always talking to themselves. In fact, they often pick animated arguments with themselves in the bathtub. The most famous Gemini in history is Orville and Wilbur Wright. Geminis are frequently abidextrous, which means that they can pick both sides of their noses at the same time. The Gemini is essentially nothing more than a paranoid Aquarius."

It is so hilariously accurate of me.  

A note on one inaccuracy- schizophrenia is not the same as dissociative identity disorder (used to be called “multiple personality disorder”) which is implied in here a bit.  That doesn’t make it necessarily unlike schizophrenia, which is maybe why people get that confused so often.  Talking to space demons* is a touch different than having your body taken over by a different personality, but it kind of looks similar form the outside.

*The most widely known delusions are centered around religion or aliens.   So space demons covers the common bases.  

My best friend is also a schizophrenic Gemini, he and I giggle over this a lot.  

The Doctor is an aquarius, and that one isn’t her at all, unfortunately.  

~Morning Star

nerdy-sapphic-witch
pokemonmasterkimba:

welpidunno:

dynastylnoire:

lastrealindians:

The Eagle Bull- Oxendine family is being sued by their child’s school for defamation, because they asked the school to permanently change their offensive and culturally insensitive Thanksgiving curriculum and to honor a two-year scholarship taken from their daughter after they voiced their concern over Native appropriation there.
They’re raising funds to defray mounting legal expenses. Please share this link and donate what you can. If they lose, we all lose. This case has the potential to set dangerous precedent where Natives are effectively gagged from speaking out against appropriation and the abuse of our culture and sacred ways by mainstream society. This is legal conquest. We can’t allow them to play Indian and hide behind judicial robes to do it. Thank you.  Contribute here: http://www.gofundme.com/8f3z30

boooooooooooooooooooooooost

They’re not even at a fifteenth of their goal right now (7/9/14) friends. If you can’t donate, at least consider reblogging this to help raise awareness!

If people can donate 70k for fucking potato salad they we be able to hit this goal.

I mean honestly.  The school recognized well enough that what they were doing was culturally inappropriate to know that Native American students would be offended and then took the course of action of asking that those students stayed home rather than changing their stereotyped insensitive offensive lesson plans.  What the hell are the students who attend these things learning? Other than that it’s acceptable to mock other cultures.  That’s really awesome for children to be getting from what is supposed to be the primary source of their education.  
~Morning Star

pokemonmasterkimba:

welpidunno:

dynastylnoire:

lastrealindians:

The Eagle Bull- Oxendine family is being sued by their child’s school for defamation, because they asked the school to permanently change their offensive and culturally insensitive Thanksgiving curriculum and to honor a two-year scholarship taken from their daughter after they voiced their concern over Native appropriation there.

They’re raising funds to defray mounting legal expenses. Please share this link and donate what you can. If they lose, we all lose. This case has the potential to set dangerous precedent where Natives are effectively gagged from speaking out against appropriation and the abuse of our culture and sacred ways by mainstream society. This is legal conquest. We can’t allow them to play Indian and hide behind judicial robes to do it. Thank you.
Contribute here: http://www.gofundme.com/8f3z30

boooooooooooooooooooooooost

They’re not even at a fifteenth of their goal right now (7/9/14) friends. If you can’t donate, at least consider reblogging this to help raise awareness!

If people can donate 70k for fucking potato salad they we be able to hit this goal.

I mean honestly.  The school recognized well enough that what they were doing was culturally inappropriate to know that Native American students would be offended and then took the course of action of asking that those students stayed home rather than changing their stereotyped insensitive offensive lesson plans.  What the hell are the students who attend these things learning? Other than that it’s acceptable to mock other cultures.  That’s really awesome for children to be getting from what is supposed to be the primary source of their education.  

~Morning Star

"Schizophrenic with delusions of lizard" (/dinosaur/dragon, depending on the day)
"I don’t mean to bite you, that’s just how I neurotically show my love for you"
"Seriously damaged"
"Bark is much much worse than bite"
~Morning Star
"I’m not a psychopath, I’m a high functioning sociopath, do your research" 
"I will end you"
"Do not feel like I’m safe only because I’m quiet"
"You should be afraid of me"
-The Doctor
Wow, these make us look bad.  But I suppose that’s the point of a warning label- to show the dangerous side of things.  Please know our positive traits are even stronger. I will try to help people to my own detriment endlessly, so don’t be scared off. 
~Morning Star (again)

"Schizophrenic with delusions of lizard" (/dinosaur/dragon, depending on the day)

"I don’t mean to bite you, that’s just how I neurotically show my love for you"

"Seriously damaged"

"Bark is much much worse than bite"

~Morning Star

"I’m not a psychopath, I’m a high functioning sociopath, do your research" 

"I will end you"

"Do not feel like I’m safe only because I’m quiet"

"You should be afraid of me"

-The Doctor

Wow, these make us look bad.  But I suppose that’s the point of a warning label- to show the dangerous side of things.  Please know our positive traits are even stronger. I will try to help people to my own detriment endlessly, so don’t be scared off. 

~Morning Star (again)

Tinkerbell from Disney’s Peter Pan with self harm marks surrounded by a visual representation of depression.
Depression can come in many forms and impacts many people.  
People don’t choose to be depressed just like no one choses to have the flu.  Anyone with depression needs support, but that can come in many forms.  Empathy and non-judgement are often the best things another person can offer. Treatment can also take many forms.  Psychiatric medication should not be dismissed, but is not the only option and should not be the entire treatment plan.  What else is needed varies from person to person, so the most important thing is to listen.  
Self harm can be a way of composing with problems, and can be triggered by many things including various mental illnesses. Most people who self harm are not trying to kill themselves and people do not self harm for attention.  Like with depression, it is important to figure out what the person who is self harming needs, and needs are different from person to person. Listen to their pain.  Help them to cope differently or to manage the underlying issues.  This is a pretty good resource.  
Colored pencil.
~Morning Star

Tinkerbell from Disney’s Peter Pan with self harm marks surrounded by a visual representation of depression.

Depression can come in many forms and impacts many people.  

People don’t choose to be depressed just like no one choses to have the flu.  Anyone with depression needs support, but that can come in many forms.  Empathy and non-judgement are often the best things another person can offer. Treatment can also take many forms.  Psychiatric medication should not be dismissed, but is not the only option and should not be the entire treatment plan.  What else is needed varies from person to person, so the most important thing is to listen.  

Self harm can be a way of composing with problems, and can be triggered by many things including various mental illnesses. Most people who self harm are not trying to kill themselves and people do not self harm for attention.  Like with depression, it is important to figure out what the person who is self harming needs, and needs are different from person to person. Listen to their pain.  Help them to cope differently or to manage the underlying issues.  This is a pretty good resource.  

Colored pencil.

~Morning Star